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INFOGRAPHIC: “Who Knew That Building A Light Rail Track Could Be So Interesting?”

Posted by GoldLine

How many swimming pools could you fill with all the ballast used in the Pasadena to Azusa segment of the Foothill Gold Line? The answer is below.

In continuing a week of celebration leading to this Saturday’s public ceremony (event details below), where we will witness the completion of the light rail track installation for the 11.5-mile Foothill Gold Line light rail project from Pasadena to Azusa, the Construction Authority has released the infographic below to reveal some fun statistics on this important element of the project.

(click image to download full-size version, < 1 mb)

Foothill Gold Line Track Completion Ceremony

Saturday, October 18, 2014

10:00 AM

795 N Dalton Ave, Azusa, CA 91702

More than 300 project stakeholders, community members, and elected officials are expected to participate at the Track Completion Ceremony the morning of October 18, 2014. During the Track Completion Ceremony, the final rail clip will be driven into place, marking the permanent connection between the cities of Pasadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale and Azusa, via this new light rail line. For more information, visit www.foothillgoldline.org.

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October 16th, 2014
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VIDEO: “Building the Light Rail Track System”

Posted by GoldLine

In anticipation of this Saturday’s public ceremony (event details below) celebrating the completion of all 28 miles of track for the Foothill Gold Line from Pasadena to Azusa, the Construction Authority has released a step-by-step video highlighting the five-step process involved in building the track system.

The video release kicks off a week of celebration, as the first Measure R-funded rail project to break ground four years ago now hits a major milestone with all 28-miles of light rail track needed for the project in place.

VIDEO: “Building the Light Rail Track System”


Foothill Gold Line Track Completion Ceremony

Saturday, October 18, 2014

10:00 AM

795 N Dalton Ave, Azusa, CA 91702

More than 300 project stakeholders, community members, and elected officials are expected to participate at the Track Completion Ceremony the morning of October 18, 2014. During the Track Completion Ceremony, the final rail clip will be driven into place, marking the permanent connection between the cities of Pasadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale and Azusa, via this new light rail line. For more information, visit www.foothillgoldline.org.

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October 14th, 2014
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Construction Update and Picture of the Week

Posted by GoldLine

Work continues on the 200-space parking facility at the future APU/Citrus College station.

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October 10th, 2014
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L.A. area ranks third on jobs near transit, says new study – The Source

Posted by GoldLine

The following article appeared in The Source on October 8, 2014.

L.A. area ranks third on jobs near transit, says new study – The Source

October 8, 2014

University of Minnesota ranks accessibility to jobs by transit in the U.S.(news release)

MinnesotaStudyMap

The study finds that Los Angeles ranks third behind New York and San Francisco when it comes to the number of jobs near transit. That puts the L.A. area ahead of some older and more established transit cities such as Chicago, Washington, Boston and Philly.

I don’t think the map is exactly shocking news to those who live here and know our area — but the map still makes a pretty visual argument for better connecting transit to downtown Los Angeles and the Westside. The map also suggests that the Measure R-funded transit projects that Metro is building or plans to build are serving a real purpose. The short list:

•The Purple Line Extension will directly connect downtown Los Angeles to Westwood via the Wilshire Corridor with a short detour to Century City.

•The Expo Line’s second phase connects Santa Monica, West L.A. and downtown L.A. via Culver City, the northern part of South L.A. and Exposition Park.

•The Regional Connector will link the Gold Line, Blue Line and Expo Line in downtown L.A. and allow easier and faster access to and through downtown L.A. for riders on all three lines.

•The Gold Line Foothill Extension extends the Gold Line to the Azusa/Glendora border, making for easier and faster access to jobs in the Pasadena area, downtown L.A. and beyond (i.e. the Westside). Meanwhile, the second phase of the Eastside Gold Line is being studied and would connect either South El Monte or Whittier to downtown L.A. via this project and the Regional Connector.

•The Crenshaw/LAX Line will serve a north-south corridor starting at the Green Line’s Redondo Beach Station and extending north to the Expo Line, including the job-rich area around the airport. The Expo Line, in turn, offers east-west access to jobs. The map also suggests that extending the Crenshaw/LAX Line north — a project in Metro’s long-range plan but unfunded — would connect people to more jobs to the east and west via the Purple Line. A South Bay Green Line Extension, also on the Measure R list, could extend the Crenshaw/LAX Line and Green Line deeper into the South Bay.

•The map also suggests that connecting the San Fernando Valley to the Westside via the Sepulveda Pass Transit Corridor makes sense and that the area along Van Nuys Boulevard — to be served by the East San Fernando Transit Corridor — is also a wise proposition in the short-term. The Sepulveda Pass Transit Corridor is a long-term project not scheduled for completion until the 2030s unless funding is found to build and accelerate it, but the project could eventually connect to the bus rapid transit or light rail built as part of the East San Fernando Valley Transit project along Van Nuys Boulevard.

•The map also shows that the Warner Center area is one of the more job rich areas in the Valley, thereby suggesting that it makes sense for Metro to pursue improvements to the Orange Line. See this recent Source post for more about that.

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October 8th, 2014
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Construction Update and Picture of the Week

Posted by GoldLine

This week, the canopy structures were installed at the Irwindale station. Here, the first of four canopy structures is being put in place.

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October 3rd, 2014
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Preview of Duarte/City of Hope Gold Line Station Art

Posted by GoldLine

Duarte/City of Hope Gold Line station artists Andrea Myklebust and Stanton Sears recently released a preview of their still-in-progress limestone art pieces, to be installed at a later date atop the steel structures at the platform.

To learn more about Andrea Myklebust and Stanton Sears and their unique artwork for the Duarte/City of Hope Gold Line station, watch their artist spotlight video feature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqFNvE9RV9w

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October 3rd, 2014
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Construction Update and Picture of the Week

Posted by GoldLine

The car wash and maintenance of way canopy frames at the Gold Line Operations Campus received a California Poppy color paint job this week.

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September 26th, 2014
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Preview of APU/Citrus College Gold Line Station Art

Posted by GoldLine

APU/Citrus College Gold Line station artist Lynn Goodpasture is currently bringing to life the mosaic artwork that will be installed at the station. Below is a small preview of the mosaic art pieces you will see at the future APU/Citrus College Gold Line station. Images are courtesy of Lynn Goodpasture.

To learn more about Lynn Goodpasture and her unique artwork for the APU/Citrus College Gold Line station, watch this artist spotlight video feature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e2-O2ppIWZA

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September 25th, 2014
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Pomona was willing suitor for Santa Fe’s railroad proposal – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Posted by GoldLine

The following article appeared in the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin on September 22, 2014.

Pomona was willing suitor for Santa Fe’s railroad proposal – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

By Joe Blackstock

September 22, 2014

Pomona found itself in the midst of two approaching armies in early 1887.

Determined companies of men and machines marched every day, getting ever closer to a confrontation with the good folks of Pomona.

But as far as Pomona was concerned, the visitors couldn’t get here fast enough.

These “armies,” coming from the west and east, were hardly anything to be feared, because in their wake brought great prosperity and wealth.

In January 1887, builders of the first transcontinental railroad to reach Los Angeles — the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe — were 35 miles apart, with one crew of workers furiously grading and putting down rails west from San Bernardino and another moving east from Pasadena.

But before they could meet, the Santa Fe needed to tie up a loose end — or rather middle. Rail officials knew where they wanted the route to go but they hadn’t really told anybody or, more importantly, acquired the land. The railroads of those days were ever arrogant in their actions, knowing that communities and individual landowners drooled at the prospect of the train coming their way and would do almost anything they wanted.

It was obvious that if you didn’t agree with what the railroad wanted, it would just go around you.

The January 27 edition of the weekly Pomona Progress reported that Ontario officials objected to the Santa Fe planning its route along Eighth Street in that city. The discussion was probably very brief — Santa Fe will win out.

Pomona folks excitedly speculated on when it would be approached by the Santa Fe and which route would be proposed. The January columns of the weekly Pomona Progress were full of train rumors and speculation.

The big day — actually two — finally arrived when an engineer and attorney from Santa Fe appeared in Pomona ready to acquire the rights-of-way.

The Progress said that on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 28 and 29, 20 local landowners sat down with the Santa Fe representatives in the Pomona courtroom of Judge Frank Fiery on Second Street. (However, most history books say it happened on Feb. 3)

The Progress of Feb. 3 reported a Santa Fe assistant engineer laid out the railroad’s wishes to the assembled Pomonans: The route would be “the south line of the (Charles) Loop place, due west to the old San Bernardino stage road and following the latter to Mud Springs (the original name of San Dimas.).

That was simple enough but the final details were certainly not arrived at easily. The actual location of the Pomona station, about 2 ½ miles north of downtown, was the real sticking point — everyone wanted the station near their ranch for the ease of shipping their goods to market. The conference lasted all day Friday without much resolution, but upon returning the next day an agreement was reached.

“In the evening the deeds were signed by A.R. Meserve, E.D. Rice and Dr. (George) Parsons giving 10 acres to the railroad company for depot purposes,” reported the Progress.

There were still a few problems requiring some additional talks between the three men and the railroads but that was finally cleared up on Feb. 23. That same day, the railroad crews started grading through what today is Claremont, north Pomona and La Verne, reported the Progress. The first trains over the new route arrived in Los Angeles on May 31, 1887.

With the railroad also arrived an army of land developers and speculators who quickly recognized the value of the land now so accessible by rail. Everywhere you looked, new towns sprouted overnight, bringing us such places as Claremont, La Verne (known as Lordsburg), San Dimas and Glendora.

For the next century, that original route was traveled by tens of thousands of Santa Fe passenger and freight trains, and today east of Claremont it carries the commuters on San Bernardino-Los Angeles Metrolink trains.

And the Santa Fe route west of Claremont? Well, that’s the scene of another railroad-building operation. The Metro Gold Line light rail project is moving ever closer and very slowly in hopes of eventually joining Los Angeles and Claremont along the 1887 route.

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September 23rd, 2014
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Gold Line extension arrives, Glendora plans affordable housing – Los Angeles Register

Posted by GoldLine

The following article appeared in the Los Angeles Register on September 19, 2014.

Gold Line extension arrives, Glendora plans affordable housing – Los Angeles Register

By Anna Iliff

September 19, 2014

GLENDORA – History may be repeating itself in Glendora.

When a new public rail stop was built more than a century ago, it played a major role in the city’s development.

In 1907, access to the Pacific Electric Railroad Co. brought the Red Car to Glendora and provided a link to downtown Los Angeles.

Four years later, in 1911, Glendora incorporated. Although the population remained fairly small, at just 700 residents, Glendora found its place on the map.

Today, the community of 51,000 is experiencing a development boom again thanks to the extension of the Metro Gold Line. As the city waits for funding and construction of a station in the heart of Glendora Village, it is taking steps to beef up housing options with the addition of several townhouse and apartment projects along the Gold Line and Route 66 corridor.

Jeff Kugel, director of planning for Glendora, said the city has been looking at developing the land along the future light-rail stop for more than a decade. He said it took awhile for the economy to improve enough, though, before developers started to solicit the city with housing plans.

“At one time, Glendora was the edge of the world,” Kugel said. “Now, with the growth of Southern California, we’re centrally located.

“The job base is not just in L.A. anymore. There are a lot more jobs within the San Gabriel Valley, and there are a lot of jobs in Orange County. We’re well-located for people to reasonably get to those areas.”

Tom Gutieras, senior director of development for AvalonBay Communities, said Glendora was in need of new apartment housing for young professionals, couples and small families.

“We feel that Glendora is an underserved market,” Guiteras said. “There aren’t many apartment homes that have been built in the last decade or more. We really saw an opportunity to provide residents with upgraded apartment housing.”

Higher-density housing near the future Gold Line station should encourage light-rail ridership and reduce car trips and traffic in the city, Guiteras said.

“We have to plan for growth, and we have to do it in the best way that we can to accommodate all of the concerns of our community,” Kugel said. “We’re mostly single-family homes, but we want to have people be able to take the light rail. We want to make sure everybody has enough water. It’s a difficult thing to manage.”

While the future Gold Line station creates a good location for incoming residents, Kugel said it’s also important for Glendora to provide housing that is affordable for younger professionals, couples and first-time homebuyers.

“Most of the land in Glendora is actually utilized for single-family developments,” he said. “In the long run, that will not change. For people who are younger and wanting to be a first-time homebuyer, these projects provide an option. What was once an affordable $14,000 single family home in 1962 is now a family’s second or third home because it’s $600,000.”

At City Council and Planning Commission meetings, some residents have said they are concerned about the changing landscapes and potential increased population and traffic.

“People are always concerned about growth and change,” Kugel said. “You always hear ‘This is not the Glendora that I moved to in 1970.’ And it’s not.

“It’s not a realistic plan for a large majority of cities to say, ‘We’re just not going to develop or build anymore. We’re not going to allow that to occur in our community. We’re done.’ I think that ignores the fact that the population will continue to grow.”

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September 23rd, 2014
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